Thursday, 16 November 2017

Change the Angle

T_a asked me what the difference was between the Spring Breeze neckline and the new ideas I have had for shaping the neck.

The Spring Breeze has the shaping system I have used in the Baby V, Button Your Top Down and Hoodies and Pullovers books. It works really well. I love using it.

Once the neckband is knit, the neck shaping is achieved by using short rows. On one side of the front the short rows end with SSK, K1 and Turn. The SSK is a decrease but it also attaches the front to the side of the neckband. The K1 kicks it over a stitch giving the neckband a 45 degree angle.

SSK, K1
         SSK, K1
                  SSK, K1
                           SSK, K1
I want to try to push this a bit and see if I can get a deeper neckline while still leaving myself some open stitches at the centre of the neckband to work a stitch panel down the front. What I've done is add extra rows that do not have a K1 at the end of the short row so do not bump the neckband over one stitch. It means that the angle is no longer 45 degrees. The extra rows add a short vertical section to the angle at the side of the neckband. One one side of the front the short rows end like this:
SSK, K1   attaches and adds to V shaping
         SSK,         attaches only, vertical
         SSK, K1,
                  SSK
If I was working a Top Down where the neckband is picked up afterwards, this is the equivalent of working an increase every 4th row. Of course I'm doing this the hard way but ... there you go, it's more fun.
I wonder what it would look like if I used P2tog instead of the SSK? That might work great. OK one more swatch just to see.
Deb

Thursday, 9 November 2017

I'm There

I think I've got it. My experiments seem to have come to a successful system I can use.

I have a system where the neckband is worked first and then short rows are worked to lower the front by working more rows across the back of the neck.
I've used this neck shaping system in several books: Button Up Your Top Down, Baby V, Hoodies and Pullovers and any "Kid's" pattern leaflets from these books. It totally works and I have several sweaters that I wear using this system. It's straight forward and easy to work once you get your head around short rows in general. You may have worked with it already.
It looks great along the edge of the neckband.

It makes a lovely dropped front of neck.

I want to take it one step further and lower the front of neck a little further, to a full 3"/7.5cm, and still have stitches left open on the Front to work a stitch pattern.

My first experiment was to work an extra SSK row. It lowered the front sufficiently but is messy.
Next I tried using German Short Rows and took out the SSK decrease which didn't work so well. The short rows turns are worked on every stitch: work short row treatment from last row, work short row turn on next stitch. This leaves slight holes along the neckband.

But I like the general idea of using the short rows. So this time I separated the short row turns by one stitch: work short row treatment from previous row, K1, work short row turn. I used Short Rows with Twin Stitches which are easy to work and look great.
This is working very well. Nice smooth raglan line and the short rows look good against the neckband.
Yahoo. I'm excited. Now to get down to crunching numbers. I really need a new sweater so am anxious to get started on the real thing.
Deb


Thursday, 2 November 2017

Almost There

I think I'm a little closer to what I have in my head. I want to start with the neckband and then work short rows to build up the back and lower the front. I am looking for a lower front of neck for more comfort. My last try at this works but it's messy.
I think this new trial is closer. It's smoother at the edges of the neckband and it's still nice and deep.
I used German Short Rows. I really like them. If you haven't tried them it's worth doing a little sample and giving them a shot. They are a great substitute for Wrap & Turn Short Rows.
But I'm taking another stab at it since I think this one is almost there.
Deb